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Women and Wine: What does this segmentation really tell us?

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women

I’m skeptical of old-fashioned segmentation: women, age groups, income levels. With so many data streams accessible and the ability to glean extensive information about consumers, we have an opportunity to reassess how we categorize affinity groups. Emerging fields like ethnography and neuroscience add layers of intelligence and new ways of approaching segments that can guide brand managers and marketers. I wrote about this in 2013 following a conference that I co-created to explore marketing themes in the wine industry, The Exchange. One example: analyzing how mothers and daughters shop together, a prevalent occasion in the Latina community, can enhance how beverage alcohol brands market to this group of potential consumers. That segment can’t be explored by broadly looking at women and wine.

Is simply halving the population enough of a segment to shed light on how to go to market? Can we glean any actionable information from this? The short answer is that it depends.

Last week, I attended a Wine Market Council research conference. The Wine Market Council has been tracking annual wine consumer attitudes and behaviors for two…

PR Industry Trends

It’s Mardi Gras: Celebrate Creole & Cajun, and Know the Difference

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New Orleans, a tapestry of history, spirituality,  tradition, culinary arts, culture, soul, architecture, music and art all in one; and a perfect place to take a trip if you want a bit of everything. At the time of my visit in late December, Mardi Gras was still about 6 weeks away but the city was already gearing up for the celebration. Now, here we are just 12 days away from Fat Tuesday when partygoers from all over the world will flood the streets of the French Quarter, a place where eating and drinking run the show.   Read More

Healthcare

Dietary Guidelines Part 2: Food and Beverage Industries that are Celebrating

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While The 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans continue to gain traction in the media and blogosphere, it is pretty obvious that the egg and meat industry are pleased with the outcome of the final guidelines, while the produce folks continue to be in a great position when it comes to health. However, a few other industries are sharing their enthusiasm for some of the newer recommendations in this year’s report.

  • Sugar Substitutes – For the first time, it is recommended that consumers limit their consumption of added sugar to less than 10 percent of their daily intake (based on a 2,000 calorie diet). That’s about 50 grams of sugar, or about the amount of sugar in a 16-ounce bottle of soda. A few makers of “healthy” and calorie-free sugar substitutes have issued press releases praising the guidelines as a way to help wean consumers off of the “real stuff.” For instance, Pyure, a manufacturer of stevia states in a press release that by switching to their product “an average American coffee drinker can cut out 24 grams of sugar, almost half of the recommended daily allowance of 50 grams.” Even Coke and Pepsi have launched product lines containing stevia in hopes to…
  • Healthcare

    Dietary Guidelines Part 1: What do they mean for marketers?

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    Every five years, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) releases Dietary Guidelines for Americans—they’re supposed to be a resource for health professionals and policymakers as they design and implement nutrition programs, like the USDA’s National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program.

    According to the HHS, about half of all American adults—117 million people, if you’re doing the math—have one or more preventable chronic diseases, many of which are related to poor quality eating patterns and physical inactivity.

    That’s not a cheap problem to be facing—in 2012, the total estimated cost of diagnosed diabetes alone was $245 billion. That’s including nearly $180 billion in direct medical costs.

    If you’re a marketer for a food or healthcare company, pay attention here. These guidelines are not just for health professionals and policymakers. This is a significant opportunity for you to help consumers not only understand the report, but also understand how they can integrate the changes into their own lifestyles.

    Take a look at the new 2015-2020 Guidelines below.

  • Follow a healthy eating pattern across the lifespan.
  • Focus on variety, nutrient density and amount.
  • Limit calories from…
  • Branding

    How to build a top-notch global marketing team

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    When I went to school for international studies, my professors never talked about how business teams functioned across global markets. It was simply a matter of mastering linguistics. However, the reality is that cultural differences can create business challenges that get in the way of doing great work.

    At the request of Felicity Carter, editor-in-chief of Meininger’s Wine Business International, I spoke on a panel called “Speaking Globally: Creating influence and negotiating deals in world markets” at Wine Vision, an annual conference that seeks to set the global agenda for the wine industry. Ms. Carter, very eloquently, spoke about direct versus indirect cultures, the significance of a strong translation partner, and how humor generally doesn’t translate well.

    I drew upon my experience in managing multi-national communications campaigns and how the concept of “glocal” – where global strategy meets local execution – has shaped effective marketing campaigns.

    A bit of background: The way we approach marketing has changed significantly in the last ten years. Gone are the days of executing one single program across the world in an imperialistic style. The phrase “glocalization,” or, in short, “glocal,” was coined…

    Product Marketing

    Why Our Phone is Our Favorite Dinner Date

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    AFor all true foodies, this is the time of year to look back in 2015 and reminisce on all the delicious meals consumed. Can’t quite remember that epic mile-high cheesecake you ate last April? Don’t fret, with 40% of Millennial’s using mobile devices during mealtime, just take a peek at your social media history for a stroll down memory lane.

    Now let’s not point fingers at just the Millennials. In fact, Baby Boomers and the Silent Generation are now even more distracted by their mobile devices during mealtime than their younger counterparts, or so Nielsen studies say.

    Yes, we must accept it – mobile devices are now a part of the dining experience, truly capturing the essence of how we enjoy food. From diners to restaurants to home chefs, here are 3 ways in which social media is impacting our relationship with food.

    FOODSTAGRAMMING

    Here’s a scenario: you get a reservation at one of the most sought-after restaurants in town, order the award-winning duck confit and dine happily in foodie heaven. But the question stands, if you do not tweet, post or Instagram a picture of this glorious, delicious moment, did it…

    PR Industry Trends

    Hungry? Click Here.

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    DanielleAs 2015 draws to a close, and we think about the advancements that impact the way we live, one word springs to mind – Uber. Whether going to the airport, a meeting, or just across town, Uber is quick, efficient and can even be economical with shared ride options. In just five years, Uber has quickly grown with service in over 60 countries and 300 cities, setting the standard for getting what we want quickly – but transportation is just the beginning.

    In this on demand culture, there are a variety of categories experiencing a shift – and there’s data to support the growing trend.  In five years, $1.75 billion has been invested in startups like Airbnb, Hotel Tonight and Seamless. As the popularity of on-demand service increases, brands are changing the way they do business. In fact, just yesterday a colleague of mine was telling me about UberPuppies—a service where Uber will bring you a puppy for 15 minutes of playtime.

    Let’s take a look at another function of Uber – UberEATS, a take-out service using the same on-demand concept but instead of taking you where you want to go, they deliver meals to you. Kind of like a food truck that comes right to your doorstep. Menus are limited so Uber can…

    Wine, Food & Nutrition

    Making Sense of Scents of the Past

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    Weird thing, the olfactory nerve.

    BThis smell-sensing bundle of neurons that starts in the nose connects directly with parts of the brain strongly connected with emotion and memory. That’s why Hallmark and other stores make a killing this time of year selling candles scented with cinnamon-y chemicals that evoke warm fuzzy feelings of fall and family. We’re smelling augmented paraffin but thinking about a pumpkin pie in the oven, somewhere from our rose-colored past.

    Because smell is actually responsible for a high percentage of our perception of “flavor,” it’s an important attribute to think about in the world of food marketing. Food and cocktail chefs have begun using spritzed essences to enhance the consumption experiences of their products, and, reportedly, outlets ranging from mall food courts to Disneyland have for years been pumping their surrounding air full of delectable scents to help lure us to their foodstuffs .

    Here on the cusp of the Thanksgiving holiday, I was thinking about a personal scent connection of unexpected importance. Last month I wrote a post about my early inspirations in the food world: TV chefs, cookbook authors and intriguing French culinary terms. But what…

    Wine, Food & Nutrition

    Bridging the Gap between Healthy Trends and Healthy Products

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    There comes a point where a trend is so long lasting that it may actually represent a shift in cultural consciousness. The current trend of consumers moving toward natural, healthy and sustainable foods is beginning to look more like society-wide standard rather than a blip in diet fads and flavor palates.

    Research has shown that Americans are taking a variety of avenues to become more connected to what they put in their bodies and, with those choices, those in leadership positions at food and beverage companies have to analyze how their organizations fit with new demands.

    One stark example of healthy directly affecting margins is the soda industry’s battle with changing eating habits. Over the past 20 years, 1consumption of carbonated soft drinks has declined 25 percent. Sodas have been positioned as the nemesis of healthy eating, a black hole of sugary sweetness devoid of any nutritional benefit, and consumers are listening and actively avoiding purchasing soft drinks.

    With attacks from government policy, school lunch rooms and health experts everywhere, soft drink companies have had to grapple with the overwhelming shift in perception. In what some call a desperate move, Coco-Cola has dumped millions of dollars into scientific research in an effort to convince consumers that soda isn’t the problem and has even gone as far as to recruit reputable scientists to make a case in favor of the sugary delight.

    As water steadily moves to replace soda as the top beverage, companies like Coca-Cola and PepsiCo might have to accept their fate at the bottom of the ladder. The 2016 Culinary Forecast survey from The National Restaurant Association shows that leaders in foodservice are expecting consumers to stick to natural, healthy, and responsibly sourced foods in 2016.

    From the NRA’s Top 20 Food Trends for 2016

    • Locally sourced meats and seafood
    • Chef-driven fast-casual concepts
    • Locally grown produce
    • Hyper-local sourcing
    • Natural ingredients/minimally processed foods

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    Digital Marketing

    Disrupting the Digital Wine Communications Community

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    DWCCspeakers

    Two weeks ago, I was one of six speakers recruited to Plovdiv, Bulgaria to inspire and to challenge how Digital Wine Communications Conference (DWCC) participants see the world.

    The goal of the DWCC’s Disrupt! Wine Talks is to present new ideas in a high-energy format: one word, one speaker with a microphone and eight minutes. The sessions are a variation on the Ignite format, in which each slide is displayed for 20 seconds, and slides automatically advance, whether the presenter is ready or not.

    To make things even more challenging, all six speakers were given the same word, “BLEND” (the conference theme) from which to build an inspirational talk from their perspective or area of expertise.

    Our task was to change people’s thinking. We were asked to push our captive audience to look at things from a new angle – to leave them asking questions, challenging assumptions and inspiring new ideas.

    One speaker, Richard Heming, MW, encouraged the wine community to “lighten up” and blend wine with humor. Simon Woolf shouted that “blending in is for losers!” and dared attendees to buck the norm. My call to action…